Anthropology Course Catalog

ANTH 100 General Anthropology
This course is an introduction to the discipline of Anthropology. Our goal is to understand human diversity in the past, present, and future through the lenses of the four primary fields of Anthropology: Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, and Sociocultural Anthropology. Students will be introduced to major concepts, research approaches, important findings, and critical controversies within the discipline as a whole. We will investigate such questions as: How did humans evolve? How have human cultures and languages developed? What tools, technologies, and new kinds of knowledge and expertise emerge in the face of global environmental, social, political, and economic change? LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 21595
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 24644
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 24974
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 24965
ANTH 102 Succeeding in Anthropology
This course is designed to enhance students' chances for success in anthropology major and life after college. Students will learn how to maximize their possibilities for gaining academic assistance, grants, and career building, as well as design strategies for winning jobs, entry into graduate programs, and paid internships at home and abroad. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatifactory basis. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 106 Introductory Linguistics
Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as LING 106.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Gabriele, Alison
MW 12:00-12:50 PM WES 3140 - LAWRENCE
3 16229
DIS
Th 08:00-08:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 19091
DIS
Th 09:00-09:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 16231
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM FR 223 - LAWRENCE
3 22485
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 28574
DIS
Th 10:00-10:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 24282
DIS
F 10:00-10:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 22486
DIS
F 11:00-11:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 19609
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 24283
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM FR 225 - LAWRENCE
3 28579
DIS
F 01:00-01:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 24284
DIS
F 02:00-02:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 28830
DIS
F 03:00-03:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 28580
DIS Zhang, Jie
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM BL 207 - LAWRENCE
3 28581
ANTH 107 Introductory Linguistics, Honors
Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. The course includes a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and introduces students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as LING 107.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 108 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
An introduction to the nature of culture, language, society, and personality. Included in this survey are some of the major principles, concerns, and themes of cultural anthropology. The variety of ways in which people structure their social, economic, political, and personal lives. Emphasized are the implications of overpopulation, procreative strategies, progress and growth of cultural complexity, developments in the Third World, and cultural dynamics in Western as well as in non-Western societies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 109 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, Honors
An honors section of ANTH 108 for students with superior academic records. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 110 Introduction to Archaeology
A general introduction to the history methods, theories, and principles of the study of archaeology. Lectures, and discussions sections cover the essential archaeological approaches, methods and practice: what is the material evidence that archaeologists collect, and how they collect and analyze it in order to understand humans of the past, their social organization, economy, subsistence, diet, technology, trade, exchange, symbol systems; how geological, palaeoenvironmental, paleontological, and genetic evidence contribute to archaeology and what was the effect of environmental and climate change on human evolution and global dispersal; what is the role of knowing the past, public archaeology, culture heritage preservation, and archaeological ethics in the modern world. Discussion sections will be used to examine material covered in lectures and in readings related to specific topics, and to explore relevant visual materials - archaeological artifacts, collections, and media sources. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 111 Introduction to Archaeology, Honors
An honors section of ANTH 110 for students with superior academic records. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 115 World Prehistory
A general introduction to the evolution of human culture around the world from the Lower Paleolithic to the emergence of complex societies. This course covers what archaeology has revealed about the experience of humankind from the origins of stone tool use to the earliest urban settlements in the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 150 Becoming Human
This course examines the biological evolution and archaeological record of humanity from the earliest human origins to the origins of civilization, and asks: Where did we come from? What makes us human? Where are we going? By unraveling the fundamental connections between biological evolution and culture, our goal is to help students appreciate how knowledge of the human past is relevant to our modern lives, whether as a KU student today, or as a future parent, medical patient, consumer, or citizen. Not open to students that have taken ANTH 309. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Sellet, Frederic
MW 11:00-11:50 AM MAL 1001 - LAWRENCE
3 29509
DIS
F 08:00-08:50 AM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29510
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29511
DIS
F 10:00-10:50 AM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29512
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29513
DIS
F 01:00-01:50 PM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29514
DIS
F 02:00-02:50 PM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29515
ANTH 151 Becoming Human, Honors
An honors section of ANTH 150 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 150. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors Program. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Raff, Jennifer
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM WES 4019 - LAWRENCE
3 28732
ANTH 160 The Varieties of Human Experience
An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 360. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Metz, Brent
MW 10:00-10:50 AM BUD 130 - LAWRENCE
3 10135
DIS
M 08:00-08:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 19446
DIS
W 08:00-08:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 19447
DIS
M 09:00-09:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 19448
DIS
F 11:00-11:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 14457
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM BL 108 - LAWRENCE
3 16825
DIS
F 10:00-10:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 16826
DIS
W 03:00-03:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 17999
DIS
W 03:00-03:50 PM BL 108 - LAWRENCE
3 16827
DIS
M 12:00-12:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 10136
DIS
Th 01:00-01:50 PM FR 214 - LAWRENCE
3 10138
DIS
M 02:00-02:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 14458
DIS
F 01:00-01:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 10137
DIS
M 03:00-03:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28537
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28538
DIS
F 08:00-08:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28539
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28540
ANTH 162 The Varieties of Human Experience, Honors
An honors section of ANTH 160 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 160 or ANTH 360. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Metz, Brent
MW 10:00-10:50 AM BUD 130 - LAWRENCE
3 24121
DIS Metz, Brent
M 11:00-11:50 AM ROB 156 - LAWRENCE
3 24129
ANTH 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Anthropology. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hoopes, John
MW 11:00-12:15 PM BL 114 - LAWRENCE
3 28170
ANTH 201 Culture and Health
This course offers a holistic, interdisciplinary approach to understandings of health, well-being, and disease within and across cultures. It draws upon the subfields of anthropology, as well as the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. (Same as GIST 210.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 202 Culture and Health, Honors
Honors version of ANTH 201 and GIST 210. This course offers a holistic, interdisciplinary approach to understandings of health, well-being, and disease within and across cultures. It draws upon the subfields of anthropology, as well as the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. (Same as GIST 211.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 210 Archaeology's Greatest Hits
This course is a broad survey of the most spectacular archaeological discoveries of our time. It tells the story of pioneers and scientist-adventurers in their quest for knowledge of human prehistory. These discoveries became historically significant because they embodied major theoretical advances and evolutionary leaps in our understanding of the past. While reviewing archaeology's greatest discoveries, this course will investigate many of the major events, such as the critical evaluation of evidence or the development of appropriate scientific techniques, that eventually established archaeology as a scientific endeavor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 212 Archaeological Myths and Realities
Archaeology is concerned with explaining mysteries of the human past ranging from the origins of human beings to the rise and fall of civilizations. This course is designed to guide students in investigations of mysteries that capture the popular imagination, but which many scientists do not wish to discuss. What is the scientific evidence for the Biblical account of Creation, the Great Flood, or the Tower of Babel? Was the Great Pyramid encoded with lost knowledge or predictions of the future? Did Chinese, Africans, Celts, or Vikings visit the Americas before Columbus? Is Stonehenge an astronomical observatory? Who built the giant statues on Easter Island? Where are the lost continents of Atlantis and Lemuria? The methods and theories of archaeology and anthropology will be used to address these and other questions. We will develop methods of evaluating information available from various published and online sources to judge when a claim represents a revolutionary new idea or a strategy for extracting money from the uninformed? Students will learn to be critical consumers of scientific and non-scientific information, and our goal will be to identify ways to be skeptical while maintaining an open mind when confronted with conflicting claims. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 291 Study Abroad Topics in: _____
A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to anthropology at the freshman/sophomore level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Department permission. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 293 Myth, Legend, and Folk Beliefs in East Asia
A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the traditional world view of the peoples of East Asia. (Same as EALC 130, REL 130.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 300 General Anthropology
A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 100. Not open to students who have had ANTH 100. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 301 Anthropology Through Films
An exploration of the human ways through films. Cross-cultural interpretations by filmed records of varieties of interpersonal relations seen through such aspects of culture as hunting, war, marriage, religion, sex, kinship, and death. Patterns of interactions are analyzed by examples from cultures around the world, primarily the non-Western world. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Gibson, Jane
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 24655
ANTH 303 Peoples and Cultures of North Africa and the Middle East
This course familiarizes students with the peoples and cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. It examines the cultural, demographic, and religious diversity of the region, as well as the development of the early Islamic community and the formation of Islamic institutions. Issues such as religion and politics, inter-religious relations, nation-building, Islamic response to colonialism, Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, secularism, democratization, and gender, are also explored. (Same as AAAS 303.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 304 Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology
Biological anthropology is an exciting discipline concerned with humans as biological beings living in cultural and natural settings. We are interested in questions pertinent and important to the scientific, social, and political agendas of the world. Material covered in this class will encourage you to pursue questions about the relationship of humans to the rest of the animal kingdom, the origin, maintenance, patterning, and significance of human biological variation, the nature of heredity, and human evolution. We will discuss the human and primate fossil records, human variation, race, and genetics. Students can expect a strong emphasis on scientific literacy, that is, how the process of scientific inquiry works. When you finish this course, you will have the tools to distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources of scientific information and a solid grounding in the fundamentals of biological anthropology. Not open to students that have taken ANTH 104 or ANTH 105. Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Norman, Lauren
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 29652
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 22582
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 28552
ANTH 308 Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology
This course covers the fundamental concepts, theories, and practices of cultural anthropology. It teaches students how to think anthropologically through a survey of classic and contemporary ethnographic texts, spanning a range of geographic and cultural areas. Applying a holistic lens, students will critically analyze inequality, globalization, and human cultural differences across time and space. Topics will include: fieldwork and ethnography; racism; ethnicity and nationalism; gender, sexuality, and kinship; socioeconomic class; the global economy; politics and power; religion; health and development; and art and media. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 108 or ANTH 109. Prerequisite: ANTH 160 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 309 Becoming Human
A more intensive treatment of ANTH 150. This course examines the biological evolution and archaeological record of humanity from the earliest human origins to the origins of civilization, and asks: Where did we come from? What makes us human? Where are we going? By unraveling the fundamental connections between biological evolution and culture, our goal is to help students appreciate how knowledge of the human past is relevant to our modern lives, whether as a KU student today, or as a future parent, medical patient, consumer, or citizen. Not open to students that have taken ANTH 150. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Sellet, Frederic
MW 11:00-11:50 AM MAL 1001 - LAWRENCE
3 29516
DIS
F 08:00-08:50 AM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29517
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29518
DIS
F 10:00-10:50 AM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29519
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29520
DIS
F 01:00-01:50 PM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29521
DIS
F 02:00-02:50 PM FR 627 - LAWRENCE
3 29522
ANTH 310 Fundamentals of Archaeology
An introduction to the history, methods, theories, and principles of archaeology. This course covers essential archaeological approaches, methods and practices to answer such questions as: What is the material evidence that archaeologists collect and how do they analyze it in order to understand humans of the past, their social organization, economy, subsistence, diet, technology, trade, exchange, and symbol systems? How do geological, palaeoenvironmental, paleontological, and genetic evidence contribute to archaeological understandings of human biological and social evolution? What was the effect of environmental and climate change on human evolution and global dispersal? How are knowledge of the past, public archaeology, culture heritage preservation, and archaeological ethics used in the modern world? Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Radovanovic, Ivana
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28553
ANTH 313 New Discoveries in Archaeology
Recent discoveries in anthropological archaeology in various areas of the world and their impact on existing bodies of fact and theory, and on established methods of archaeological discovery. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 315 The Prehistory of Art
A survey of prehistoric art focusing on the material record and interpretations of rock art (paintings, engravings on rock surfaces in rock-shelters, caves and in open air sites) and portable art created by prehistoric people. The emphasis is on the small-scale societies (hunter-gatherer and early food producers) around the world before the appearance of written records in respective geographic areas. Environmental, social and cultural contexts in which these art forms were created are discussed along with a review of past scholarship and current interpretive approaches to this old and enduring expression of human creativity. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. (Same as HA 315.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 317 Prehistory of Europe
A survey of one million years of prehistory from the peopling of the European continent to the Roman Empire. The course will focus on the growth of culture, considering economy and technology, art and architecture. Topics will include the Neanderthals, the big game hunters of the Ice Age, the megalith builders, the Celts. Prerequisite: An introductory course in anthropology, history, or cultural geography. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Radovanovic, Ivana
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM FR 214 - LAWRENCE
3 23618
ANTH 318 Peoples of the Great Plains
A survey of the diverse and changing lifeways of Native Americans in the Great Plains region from the time of the earliest inhabitants more than 13,000 years ago to the modern era. Collections of prehistoric and historic Native American material culture will be used to illustrate the diversity of technologies and artistry of indigenous Great Plains peoples. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 320 Language in Culture and Society
Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as LING 320.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Duncan, Philip
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM MAL 2001 - LAWRENCE
3 24294
ANTH 321 Language in Culture and Society, Honors
An honors section of ANTH 320 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 320 or LING 320. (Same as LING 321.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 323 Environmental Dynamics in India
This course introduces students to the relationships the people of India have had with their landscape from ancient times to the present. Students will learn about diverse ecosystems and the indigenous peoples they have harbored from the high Himalayas altitudes to the coastal regions, from the desolate arid deserts to the rain forests of India. The class will discuss how the very nature of the relationship of the people with their land has changed over the long course history of South Asia with specific case studies of environmental challenges, failures and successes. Examples of possible cases include: the Chipko movement led by the women of the Himalayas to save their forests from loggers; the traditions of creating lakes and water conservation lifestyles in the arid region of Rajasthan; and nature worship and cases of leopards and tigers receiving protection by the very villages they terrorize. (Same as GIST 323.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 325 Language, Gender, and Sexuality
This class bridges cultural and linguistic anthropology by exploring the varied and sometimes surprising relationships among language, gender, and sexuality. We examine earlier perspectives focused on biological sex and gender difference and more recent work, including queer theory and views of gender and sexuality as enacted through language. This class will explore two long-standing substantive and ethical debates in the field: whether language itself is sexist and whether each gender uses language differently. Students will investigate how gender is performed through language and influenced by social class, ethnicity, sexuality, and transgender and other gender-transgressive identities. (Same as WGSS 325.) Prerequisite: ANTH 320/LING 320 or ANTH 321/LING 321 suggested. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 340 Human Variation and Evolution
An examination of biochemical and physical variability in contemporary human populations. Topics include: genetic basis of human diversity, evolutionary theory, population genetics, blood groups, biochemical variations, body size and shape, pigmentation, and other morphological characteristics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biological anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Norman, Lauren
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM FR 225 - LAWRENCE
3 29651
ANTH 341 Human Evolution
The evolutionary processes and events leading to the development of humans and the humanlike forms from primate ancestors; fossil hominids and the origin of modern Homo Sapiens. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biological anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 343 Food, Nutrition and Culture
The course is a cross-cultural survey of human dietary practices (foodways). Students are introduced to the concepts of nutrition, diet and cuisine. Evolutionary and adaptive aspects of human diets and cuisines are considered. Nutritional, environmental/ technological, social and ideological aspects of regional and ethnic foodways are examined. Invited lecturers from different cultural traditions offer indigenous perspectives on their foodways. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 345 Introduction to Human Evolutionary Biology
This course takes students on the evolutionary journey of the human species: from the origin of the primate order to modern human population diversity. It examines human adaptations to extreme environments, nutrition and the role of the microbiome in human health, and human evolutionary genomics in the foundations of immunity and their intersection with public health. It evaluates our Neandertal ancestry, and tracks major human migrations and dispersals in the peopling of the world. All topics are examined through the lens of molecular evolutionary approaches to the study of human diversity. An introduction to biology or biological anthropology course is recommended. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 350 Human Adaptation
A survey and examination of present-day human populations focusing upon adaptations in different environments and the interaction of culture and biology. General evolutionary theory is treated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of evolutionary change. Genetic, physiological, and cultural adaptations to environmental stress are discussed from the standpoint of their past evolutionary significance and their influence on contemporary human variation. Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or ANTH 150/ANTH 151 or ANTH 304 or ANTH 340 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 352 Controversies on the Living and the Dead
A critical analysis of conflicting perspectives on scientific and anthropological research, past and present. Topics considered include the nature of science, colonialism in anthropology and biology, origin stories and human evolution, the ethics of research in ancient and contemporary populations, eugenics, biological race, and the relationship between humans and our extinct hominin relatives. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biological anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Raff, Jennifer
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM FR 214 - LAWRENCE
3 28163
ANTH 359 Anthropology of Sex
An evolutionary perspective on the behavior and biology of males and females in human society. Topics will include the evolution of sexual dimorphism, social and biological issues in human reproduction, primate social patterns, human sexual behavior and taboos, sex and social structure, and the sociobiology of sex. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 360 The Varieties of Human Experience
A more intensive treatment of ANTH 160. An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 160. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Metz, Brent
MW 10:00-10:50 AM BUD 130 - LAWRENCE
3 10139
DIS
M 08:00-08:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 19449
DIS
W 08:00-08:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 19450
DIS
M 09:00-09:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 19451
DIS
F 11:00-11:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 14459
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM BL 108 - LAWRENCE
3 16822
DIS
F 10:00-10:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 16823
DIS
W 03:00-03:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 18000
DIS
W 03:00-03:50 PM BL 108 - LAWRENCE
3 16824
DIS
M 12:00-12:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 10140
DIS
Th 01:00-01:50 PM FR 214 - LAWRENCE
3 10142
DIS
M 02:00-02:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 14460
DIS
F 01:00-01:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 10141
DIS
M 03:00-03:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28541
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28542
DIS
F 08:00-08:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28543
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM FR 124 - LAWRENCE
3 28544
ANTH 361 The Third World: Anthropological Approaches
A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 161. Not open to students who have had ANTH 161. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 363 Gendered Modernity in East Asia
This course explores rapidly changing gender relationships and the sense of being "modern" in East Asia by examining marriage and family systems, work, education, consumer culture, and geopolitics. The class seeks to understand how uneven state control over men and women shapes desires, practices, and norms and how men and women act upon such forces. Avoiding biological or social determinism, this course treats gender as an analytical category and examines how modern nation-states and global geopolitics are constituted and operated. (Same as EALC 363 and WGSS 363.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 367 Introduction to Economic Anthropology
This course uses ethnographic case materials to explore the ways humans provision themselves under different social and environmental conditions. It introduces the basic theories, concepts, and debates of economic anthropology and provides a foundation for more advanced courses in this subdiscipline. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 160/ANTH 162 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 360 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 368 The Peoples of China
An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of China. Emphasis on historical development, social structure, cultural continuity and change, and ethics. (Same as EALC 368.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 372 Religion, Power, and Sexuality in Arab Societies
This course examines theories of religion, discourse, power, gender and sexuality in their application to Arab societies. The course introduces different aspects of Arab cultures. Through canonical works, we study political domination, tribal social organization, honor, tribe, shame, social loyalty, ritual initiations and discuss how these issues speak generally to anthropological inquiry. Regionally specific works are then framed by an additional set of readings drawn from anthropological, linguistics, and social theories. (Same as AAAS 372.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 376 North American Indians
A survey of American Indian cultures north of Mexico at the time of the first contact with Western civilization; detailed studies of selected Indian cultures. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 379 Indigenous Traditions of Latin America
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken LAA 634. (Same as LAA 334.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 380 Peoples of South America
A survey of native peoples and cultures of South America from the time of initial Western contacts to the present day. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 382 People and the Rain Forest
An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of the neotropics. Emphasizing the peoples of Amazonia, the course introduces students to topics associated with the economic, political, and cultural dimensions of social life in rain forest communities. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 389 The Anthropology of Gender: Female, Male, and Beyond
This course will introduce students to cultural constructions and performances of masculinity, femininity, and alternative genders across time and space. Topics and cases will be drawn from primarily non-Western cultures, ranging from Japanese markets to Pacific Rim gardens, and from Haitian voudou to Maya royal politics. This course uses research by archeologists, linguists, biological anthropologists, and sociocultural anthropologists. (Same as WGSS 389.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Roselyn, Beth
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 23317
LEC Roselyn, Beth
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 23254
ANTH 391 Topics in Anthropology: _____
This course offers students an opportunity to study classical and emerging topics in the four primary fields of Anthropology: Biological Anthropology, Linguistics, Sociocultural Anthropology, and Archaeology. Concepts and approaches to each field will used to investigate past and present examples from around the world. Topics will be examined with an emphasis on the unity of the anthropological approach. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 397 Museum Anthropology
An introduction to the historical background, practice, and ethical issues involved in the creation, presentation, and dissemination of anthropological information in a museum setting. Students participate in the study of a collection of material culture (artifacts) from the Museum of Anthropology, culminating in development of a script for an exhibit. FLD.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
FLD Olsen, Sandra
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM SP 6A - LAWRENCE
3 28180
ANTH 400 Topics in Anthropology, Honors: _____
Selected issues and theories in contemporary anthropology (cultural, linguistic, biological, archaeological) for honors students. Topic for semester to be announced. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite: Admission to University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 401 Integrating Anthropology
Capstone course that integrates the primary fields of anthropology. Students apply concepts and approaches from each field to a particular topic in preparation for and presentation of a cross-disciplinary and integrative final project. Prerequisite: Completion of ANTH 150/ANTH 151 or ANTH 160/ANTH 162/ANTH 360 and any two other anthropology courses. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 406 Archaeological Research Methods
A survey of basic field methods and laboratory procedures associated with specimen acquisition, preparation, analysis, classification, and measurement of archaeological materials. In this course students will apply archaeological methods to the study of stone tools, ceramics, and animal bone, learn which field and lab methods to use in a range of research scenarios, interpret human behavior on the basis of artifacts and features recovered from archaeological sites, use introductory flintknapping techniques to produce a stone tool, study the major dating and chronological methods used in archaeology, and complete labs and projects that require analysis and interpretation of archaeological materials. Prerequisite: ANTH 110/ANTH 111 or ANTH 150/ANTH 151 or ANTH 310 or permission of instructor. LAB.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 415 The Rise of Civilization
A study of evolutionary processes leading to the birth of the early great urban civilizations of the Old World and the New World. Patterns of growth and similarities and differences in the rise of urban complexes and states in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, and in Mexico/Guatemala and Peru. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 418 Summer Archaeological Field Work
Under the direction of a professional archaeologist, undergraduate and graduate students are taught proper procedures for the excavation and laboratory analysis of data from a prehistoric or historic archaeological site. Data gathered may be used for additional graduate research. Enrollment by application; limited to twenty students. A fee for subsistence costs will be charged. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 419 Training in Archaeological Field Work
Undergraduate and graduate students are taught techniques of archaeological field work, including survey and excavation, as well as laboratory procedures, including artifact classification and curation. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 430 Linguistics in Anthropology
The study of language as a symbolic system. Exploration into the interrelatedness of linguistic systems, of nonlinguistic communicative systems, and of other cultural systems. (Same as LING 430.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 431 Constructed Languages
Constructed languages are devised by individuals to facilitate international communication (Esperanto) or to enhance fictional or fantasy worlds (Lapine, Newspeak, Klingon, Elvish, Navi'i, the Common Tongue, Valyrian). Invented or constructed languages provide a means to study both the universals of linguistic expression (grammar) and the cultural contexts from which they emerge. Students will construct languages and evaluate the cultural motivations of existing ConLangs. Prerequisite: ANTH 106 or ANTH 107 recommended. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 441 Laboratory/Field Methods in Biological Anthropology
This biological anthropology lab course builds upon concepts introduced in ANTH 150 and ANTH 304. The course provides students with practical, hands-on experience in biological anthropology laboratory methods and theory. We will cover the following topics: genetics, osteology, forensic anthropology, modern human biological variation, primatology, paleoanthropology, and human evolution. Students will integrate their knowledge of human variation, genetics, and critical approaches to the concept of social and biological race. Students will have an opportunity to investigate their own or a sample genome in a final project analyzing genetic markers using a commercial ancestry test. Prerequisite: ANTH 304 or ANTH 340 or Human Biology major or permission of instructor. LAB.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 442 Anthropological Genetics
Principles of human genetics involved in biological anthropology. The genetics of non-Western populations considered within an evolutionary framework. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biological anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 445 Topics in Biological Anthropology: _____
Seminar concentrating on selected problems and issues in contemporary biological anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biological anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 447 Human Behavioral Genetics
A survey of human behavioral genetics for upper division undergraduates. Emphasis is on how the methods and theories of quantitative, population, medical, and molecular genetics can be applied to individual and group differences in humans. Both normal and abnormal behaviors are covered, including intelligence, mental retardation, language and language disorders, communication, learning, personality, and psychopathology. (Same as BIOL 432, PSYC 432, SPLH 432.) Prerequisite: Introductory courses in biology/genetics or biological anthropology and psychology are recommended. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 449 Laboratory/Field Work in Human Biology
Faculty supervised laboratory or field research for Human Biology majors. Students design and complete a research project in collaboration with a Human Biology faculty member. (Same as BIOL 449, SPLH 449, and PSYC 449.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Human Biology major. LAB.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 459 Anthropology of Sex, Honors
The course is an introduction to the evolutionary study of human sexual behavior. Using an explicitly Darwinian framework, it examines the biological basis for human mate selection, male and female mating strategies, child-birth and child-care practices, parental care, marriage, and family structure. The power of Darwinian theory to predict human sexual behavior is tested in anthropological field studies, designed and carried out by students in the class. Class time is allocated for discussion of students' research as it progresses through each stage, and results are presented in the last weeks of the semester. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biology or biological anthropology. Admission to the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 460 Theory in Anthropology
A critical examination of the main theories and concepts in cultural anthropology. Consideration of the philosophical presuppositions underlying past and current theoretical issues and trends. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 461 Introduction to Medical Anthropology
An introduction to the social and cultural practices that contribute to health and disease, including a survey of therapy systems in both Western and non-Western societies (e.g., Native American, African, Western allopathic medicine, etc.). This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 462 Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to ethical considerations, methods used in ethnographic fieldwork, field notes, coding data, analysis, and write-up. Students design and carry out research projects. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 160 or ANTH 162 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 360 or permission of instructor. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 465 Genocide and Ethnocide
This course provides students with a conceptual and historical synopsis of genocide and ethnocide from an anthropological perspective. Taking its lead from a human rights orientation, the course assesses why such atrocities must be confronted. This includes grappling with ethical, legal and definitional ambiguities surrounding the concepts of genocide and ethnocide. We will explore a range of cases in the 20th and 21st centuries, while focusing on diverse conditions leading to genocide, ethnocide, population displacements, human trafficking and the modern phenomena of refugee camps. The course will analyze the role of the modern state, colonialism, political ideologies, ethnicity and nationalism as major forces underpinning ethnocide and genocidal campaigns. Based primarily on a select review of cases of ethnocide and genocide, the class examines how to spread global awareness and communal engagement by actively protecting human rights. (Same as GIST 465.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 474 Applied Cultural Anthropology
Applications of anthropological theory, methods, and findings in programs of community and national development, public health, international aid, and military assistance. Examination of the role of the anthropologist, of ethics and values in intervention schemes, and of the organization of planned change in applied programs. Intensive analysis of selected case studies. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 480 Technology and Society in the Contemporary World
The impact of scientific and technological advances on social and personal life in contemporary society. A wide range of topics will be dealt with during the semester; examples include the internet and new modes of communication, developments in genetics and medicine, and testing for intelligence, drugs, lie detection, and other purposes. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 484 Magic, Science, and Religion
A comparative study of religion and systems of value and belief in non-Western cultures. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hannoum, Majid
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 28164
ANTH 491 Study Abroad Topics in: _____
A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to topics in anthropology at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Department permission. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 496 Reading and Research
Individual investigation of special problems in anthropology. Maximum of three credit hours in any one semester. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Adair, Mary
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10143
IND Dean, Bartholomew
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 21730
IND Dwyer, Arienne
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10144
IND Gibson, Jane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10145
IND Hannoum, Majid
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 15056
IND Hoopes, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10149
IND Mandel, Rolfe
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 13741
IND Metz, Brent
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 14211
IND Orourke, Dennis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 22072
IND Radovanovic, Ivana
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10148
IND Raff, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 22945
IND Sellet, Frederic
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 17254
ANTH 497 Field Experience
A supervised field or laboratory-based experience in the United States or abroad. Students may receive this credit for an independent or collaborative research project or in conjunction with field school participation. Students may also acquire credit for supervised placements in organizations, agencies, museums or other settings in which they apply anthropological knowledge to real-life situations and actively participate in organized work within a community. The field experience should not duplicate any other regularly available course. A contract between mentor and student is required at the beginning of the experience, and a reflection paper is required at the end of the experience. Students are strongly recommended to have completed at least one anthropology methods course prior to enrolling in Field Experience. Prerequisite: Permission and supervision by anthropology instructor required. FLD.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
FLD Dean, Bartholomew
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28249
FLD Dwyer, Arienne
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28250
FLD Gibson, Jane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28251
FLD Adair, Mary
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28248
FLD Hannoum, Majid
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28252
FLD Hoopes, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28254
FLD Mandel, Rolfe
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28255
FLD Metz, Brent
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28256
FLD Orourke, Dennis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28257
FLD Radovanovic, Ivana
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28258
FLD Raff, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28259
FLD Sellet, Frederic
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 28260
ANTH 499 Senior Honors Research
Individual research under the direction of one or more instructors in the department. Maximum of four credit hours in any one semester. Prerequisite: A grade-point average of 3.5 in anthropology and 3.0 in all courses, and permission of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Adair, Mary
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10150
IND Dean, Bartholomew
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 21977
IND Dwyer, Arienne
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10151
IND Gibson, Jane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10152
IND Hannoum, Majid
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10153
IND Hoopes, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 15055
IND Mandel, Rolfe
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10154
IND Metz, Brent
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 13742
IND Orourke, Dennis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10155
IND Radovanovic, Ivana
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 22071
IND Raff, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 10156
IND Sellet, Frederic
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3-6 21687
ANTH 500 Topics in Archaeology: _____
Seminar concentrating on selected problems and issues in contemporary archaeology. Topic for semester to be announced. Course may be repeated for a maximum of nine hours of credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a course in archaeology at any level, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 501 Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology: _____
Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary sociocultural anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 502 Topics in Anthropological Linguistics: _____
Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary anthropological linguistics. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 503 Topics in Biological Anthropology: _____
Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary biological anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 504 North American Archaeology
A general survey of the archaeology of North America. Detailed coverage of selected problems. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 505 Prehistory of Eastern North America
A survey of the archaeological record of eastern North America from the late Pleistocene to the time of European contact. The diverse environments of eastern North America are considered in conjunction with the dynamic climatic and ecological changes which have occurred during the past 20,000 years to provide a background for study of the prehistoric groups who occupied the region. Topics will include the change in economies, technologies, and organization from the earliest hunter-gatherers through the development of pre-Colombian complex societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 151 or ANTH 310 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 506 Ancient American Civilizations: Mesoamerica
An archaeological survey of the Precolombian heritage of Mexico and Central America. The sites and cultures of the Olmecs, Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Zapotecs, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs will be considered in detail. Investigations of ancient art and architecture, crafts and technologies, trade and exchange, religious beliefs and practices, and writing and calendrical systems will be directed toward understanding the growth and the decline of these Native American civilizations. (Same as LAA 556.) Prerequisite: A course in Anthropology, Latin American Studies, Art History, Museum Studies, Indigenous Studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hoopes, John
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM CDUP 1200 - LAWRENCE
3 28165
ANTH 507 The Ancient Maya
An intensive examination of current scholarship on the ancient Maya civilization of Mexico and Central America. The course will consider Maya culture from its roots in early villages of the Preclassic period to the warring city-states of the Postclassic period. Topics will include settlement and subsistence systems, sociopolitical evolution, art and architecture, myth and symbolism, and Maya hieroglyphic writing. An important theme of the course will be the relevance of the Precolumbian Maya for understanding complex societies and contemporary Latin American Culture. (Same as LAA 557.) Prerequisite: A course in Anthropology, Latin American Studies, Art History, Museum Studies, or Indigenous Studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 508 Ancient American Civilizations: The Central Andes
An archaeological survey of the ancient peoples of Peru and neighboring countries in South America. The origins of complex societies on the coast and in the Andean highlands will be reviewed with special consideration of the role of "vertical" environments in the development of Andean social and economic systems. Cultures such as Chavin, Moche, Nazca, Huari, Tiahuanaco, Chimu, and the rise of the imperial Inca state will be examined through artifacts, architectural remains, and ethnohistoric documents. (Same as LAA 558.) Prerequisite: A course in Anthropology, Latin American Studies, Art History, Museum Studies, or Indigenous Studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 509 Ancient Central America
This course will examine the Precolumbian cultures of the region situated between Mesoamerica to the north and the Central Andes to the south, focusing principally on the countries of Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia. Once regarded as an "Intermediate Area" on the peripheries of the ancient civilizations to the north and south, the area of southern Central America and northern South America is now recognized as a center of innovation from very remote times up until the Spanish Conquest. The archaeological remains of stone tools, pottery, jade carvings, gold and copper ornaments, and a wide variety of structures will be interpreted within the context of information on subsistence, settlement patterns, social organization and religious ideology. Issues of the relationships with populations of regions in major culture areas to the north and south will also be considered in detail. (Same as LAA 559.) Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 115. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 511 Archeology of Inequality
Archaeological record of funerary rites, architecture, ceremonial objects and nutritional indicators is often the sole evidence of inequality in the past, especially in the absence of written sources or unbiased historical observations. Case studies describing past small-scale and emergent complex societies worldwide are chosen to help understand the interplay between individual status and rank (achieved or ascribed), group inequality and subordination (class, caste, gender, age, race), wealth (material, embodied, relational), and the role of power and resistance in shaping these societies. Egalitarianism as a leveling mechanism in many of the past societies is also explored. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior or Graduate status, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 515 Topics in Old World Prehistory: _____
Topic for the semester to be announced. An introductory course in archaeology recommended. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 516 Hunters and Gatherers
The diversity of hunter-gatherer cultures documented in the ethnographic and archaeological records is considered on a global scale, with particular attention given to the relationships between environment, technology, and organization. The evolution of hunter-gatherers from the earliest hominids until their interaction with more complex societies is considered, with emphasis given to the variation and nature of change in these societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 150/151 or ANTH 160 or ANTH 162 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 517 Geoarchaeology
Application of the concepts and methods of the geosciences to interpretation of the archeological record. The course will focus primarily on the field aspects of geoarchaeology (e.g., stratigraphy, site formational processes, and landscape reconstruction), and to a lesser extent on the array of laboratory approaches available. (Same as GEOG 532.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104, ANTH 110, or ANTH 310. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 518 Environment and Archaeology
An investigation of the relationships between the biophysical world and the development of human cultures. Examination of archaeological methods employed in the study of these relationships. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 519 Lithic Technology
An introduction to the analysis and interpretation of prehistoric stone industries. Topics discussed include origins and development of lithic technology, principles of description and typology, use and function of stone tools; interpretation of flint knapping. Prerequisite: An introductory course in archaeology. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 520 Archaeological Ceramics
Practicum in the method and theory of pottery analysis in archaeology. Topics include manufacturing techniques, classification, and compositional analysis of pottery artifacts, as well as strategies for interpreting the role of ceramic vessels in food production, storage, and consumption; social and ritual activities; trade and exchange; and the communication of ideas. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 151 or ANTH 310 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 521 Zooarchaeology
This course is intended to complement faunal identification with practical involvement in analyses and interpretation of archaeological faunal assemblages using a variety of modern methods. Students will participate in the study of specific archaeological faunal remains, development of comparative zooarchaeological collections, and in middle-range research to document the variety of agents that affect faunal remains. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 151 or ANTH 310 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 523 Great Plains Archaeology
A survey is provided of the archaeological record and its interpretations for the Great Plains area of North America. The records from earliest human occupation, variation in hunter and gatherer societies, to horticultural and farming societies, and the historic period are reviewed. The history of archaeological research in the region, explanatory frameworks and models, and discussion of changes in economy, technology, mobility, social organization, and population movements are among the topics of concern. Prerequisite: ANTH 110, ANTH 310, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 540 Demographic Anthropology
This course will survey demographic topics that are relevant to anthropological research and theory. Topics will include family and household structure, fertility, nuptiality, mortality, migration, and paleodemography. Emphasis will be placed on methods in use in these areas and applications from the literature. Prerequisite: Three courses in anthropology (at least one in physical and one in cultural) or graduate standing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 542 Biology of Human Nutrition
Lecture and discussion. A comprehensive introduction to human nutrition, focusing on the anatomical, biochemical, and physiological aspects of nutrition. The essential nutrients and their role in human metabolism are covered in detail, and the course's systemic approach places a strong emphasis on integration of metabolism. Students also are introduced to human dietary evolution, the concept of nutritional adaptation, and cross-cultural differences in diet and nutritional physiology. Discussion sections focus on applied aspects of human nutrition, including dietary assessment. The course is a prerequisite for ANTH 543, which is recommended as the second course in a sequence on human nutrition. Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 304, and BIOL 152. Students who have not had BIOL 152 should have taken a comparable introductory course in organismal physiology. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 543 Nutrition Through the Life Cyle
The first half of the course focuses on nutrition through the life cycle, with an emphasis on biological, cultural, and environmental factors that influence human dietary intake and nutrition across the life span. Particular attention is given to the role of nutrition in cross-cultural variation in human growth, development, and aging. The second half of the course examines evolutionary aspects of human nutrition, including the origins and adaptive significance of regional and cultural basis. The development of taste and food preferences, at the level of the individual and population, as well as symbolic aspects of dietary behavior also will be considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 542 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 544 Origins of Native Americans
A survey of the genetic, linguistic, historic, archaeological, and morphological evidence for the origins of indigenous populations of the Americas. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 545 Contemporary Health Issues in Africa
The course examines health and nutrition in African communities, using the methods of biological and medical anthropology. Fundamental to the approach taken in the course is the understanding that the health of human groups depends on interactions between biological and cultural phenomena in a particular ecological context. One topic will be selected per semester, to examine in detail the full array of epidemiological factors contributing to patterns of specific diseases. AIDS, childhood diseases, and reproductive health of African women are among possible topics. Course material will be selected from scholarly and medical publications, as well as coverage in the popular media. The use of a variety of sources will enhance understanding of the biological and cultural issues involved and will help students identify possible bias and misinformation in popular coverage of events such as famine or epidemic in African settings. (Same as AAAS 554.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in either anthropology or African studies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 555 Evolution of Human Diseases
This course traces the evolution of human diseases over the past 3 million years. Topics include paleopathology, epidemics/pandemics, genetic adaptations to diseases, and emerging/reemerging diseases. In addition, interrelationships between humans and diseases, coupled with interactions with other animals, vectors, and natural and cultural environments are discussed. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 561 Indigenous Development in Latin America
Surveys the history of the development enterprise since WWII, examines the marginalization and impoverishment of Latin America's indigenous peoples, and provides training to carry out projects for and with them to enhance their quality of life. Development is understood as not merely technological or economic, but also social, emotional, and educational. Students work in teams to design their own mock development project. A 3-credit non-obligatory companion course, Applied Anthropological Field School among the Ch'orti' Maya, will follow in the intersession after each version of this course. (Same as LAA 561.) Prerequisite: ANTH 100, ANTH 108, ANTH 160 or LAA 100; or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 562 Mexamerica
This class surveys the relations between Mexico and the U.S. as nation-states, and among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Anglo Americans (to a lesser extent other U.S. citizens) in historical perspective. Issues of sovereignty, national and ethnic identity, immigration, migration, labor relations, popular culture, media, and transnational economics are covered. (Same as LAA 562.) Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 160 or ANTH 360 or LAA 100. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 564 The Peoples of Africa
"Peoples of Africa" examines the anthropology of Sub-Saharan Africa through selected case studies of particular societies and issues that have wider comparative relevance. Normally two to four societies are selected for the semester and studied through ethnographic, historical, and literary monographs. These case studies are examined in their pre-colonial, colonial, and postcolonial histories. Lectures, readings, and exercises emphasize three kinds of reasoning -- geographical, historical, and cultural context -- required to grasp events and issues in unfamiliar societies. The course also features major anthropological ideas that emerged in the study of African society, and tracks how anthropology has been adapted by African scholars, policy makers, and activists. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 565 Popular Images in Japanese Culture, Literatures, and Films
The course examines recurring themes and images in Japanese culture through films, literary works, and ethnographic studies. These themes and images include youth cultures, urban and rural lives, national identities, and Japan's globalization. The course explores them in socio-historically specific contexts of Japan and its geopolitical relations to other countries. (Same as EALC 565.) Prerequisite: Any Anthropology or Japanese course, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 569 Contemporary Central America and Mexico
Mexico and Central America have formed a cultural interaction zone for thousands of years, and today share common challenges, particularly political, economic, and social ones related to the Spanish colonial legacy, U.S. involvement, and their place in the global economy. Some of the issues addressed include racism, civil war, migration, youth gangs, narco-trafficking, resource extraction, homeless children, the transition from local subsistence economies to low-income work, and struggles for indigenous rights. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 160 or ANTH 162 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 360 or LAA 100 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 570 Anthropology of Violence
Introduces students to the comparative and cross-cultural study of violence. The course begins by surveying different anthropological approaches to the study of violence, with special attention paid to classical social theorists as well as ethnographic works. Topics may include (post) coloniality and identity politics, nationalism, race, religion, and political culture; geographic areas to be covered may include Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and South Asia. (Same as GIST 570.) Prerequisite: Junior standing or above or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 580 Feminism and Anthropology
This seminar will introduce students to feminism in anthropology, including feminist theories, methodologies, ethnographic styles, and the history of women in the discipline since the late 1800s. Emphasis is on the social contexts for feminist theory-building since the 1960s and changing ideas about gender and power. (Same as WGSS 580.) Prerequisite: One of the following: ANTH 389, ANTH 460, WGSS 201; or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 581 Food Systems and Sustainability
How shall we feed ourselves? In the face of unprecedented world population growth, humanity must meet the challenge of providing minimum caloric needs while preserving the health of ecosystems for future generations. In this course, students will explore different food cultures and production strategies developed by people in societies around the world. These include foraging, horticulture, pastoralism, intensified horticulture, and industrial agriculture. We will compare the social, economic, and environmental sustainability of various food systems and technologies and their impact on larger social and ecological systems. Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 160. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 582 Ethnobotany
Course will involve lectures and discussion of Ethnobotany - the mutual relationship between plants and traditional people. Research from both the field of anthropology and botany will be incorporated in this course to study the cultural significance of plant materials. The course has 7 main areas of focus: 1) Methods in Ethnobotanical Study; 2) Traditional Botanical Knowledge - knowledge systems, ethnolinguistics; 3) Edible and Medicinal Plants of North America (focus on North American Indians); 4) Traditional Phytochemistry - how traditional people made use of chemical substances; 5) Understanding Traditional Plant Use and Management; 6) Applied Ethnobotany; 7) Ethnobotany in Sustainable Development (focus on medicinal plant exploration by pharmaceutical companies in Latin America). (Same as EVRN 542 and ISP 542.) Prerequisite: EVRN 142, EVRN 145, EVRN 148, ANTH 150/151, ANTH 160/162/360 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 583 Love, Sex, and Globalization
Escalating transnational flows of information, commodities, and people have created innumerable kinds of "intimate" contacts on a global scale, such as mail order brides, child adoption, sex tourism, commodified romance, and emotional labor. Exploring the ways that cultural artifacts of intimacy are rendered, fetishized, and reified in a free market economy, this course examines how discourses on love and sex encounter, confront, and negotiate the logics of the capitalist market, the discrepant narratives of (colonial) modernity, and the ethics of pleasure. In so doing, this course navigates the treacherous interplay among emotions-specifically love, sex, and money, seeking the potential and limits of cultural politics of emotions. (Same as WGSS 583.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Quiason, Marcy
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM BL 212 - LAWRENCE
3 28424
ANTH 586 Visual Anthropology
This course takes a hands-on approach to the study of theory, ethics, and methods in visual ethnographic representation. Students also read and consider historical dimensions in this subdiscipline and complete individual and team projects in photographic and videographic media. Prerequisite: An introductory course in cultural anthropology or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 587 Multidisciplinary Field School in Partnership with the Chorti Maya
Teams of interdisciplinary students partner with the Chorti Maya of Guatemala and Honduras to share information and experiences. One third of the course consists of readings and 4-5 orientation sessions on campus, and two thirds entails two weeks in Central America. Examples of activities might include historical research, water testing and improvement, photography, art, music, tourism consultation, marketing of crafts, human rights advocacy, web design, computer training, and museum work, among others. There are no prerequisites, but students with a working knowledge of Spanish will receive preference for admission. (Same as LAA 587.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 595 The Colonial Experience
An anthropological and historical examination of the processes and dynamics of the colonial experience. Cross-cultural psychosocial phenomena that have profoundly affected the values and social organizations of both colonizers and colonized will be emphasized. Specific examples will be chosen from the former American, Japanese, and European colonial empires with emphasis on Asia. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 603 Shamanism Past and Present
This course explores shamanism, broadly defined as the practice of gaining insight through the use of ecstatic techniques (dance, drumming, trance, vision quests, and the use of psychotropic substances) for the purpose of interpreting existence and healing illnesses, through a consideration of theories and evidence for its practice from Upper Paleolithic times to the present day. Examples from the ancient cultures of Asia, Europe, Africa, Australia, and the Americas are used to explore current theoretical approaches in order to identify shamans and shamanism in the past. Issues of identifying shamans and shamanism in art and archaeological contexts are discussed. The course also explores the role that shamanism plays in a wide variety of cultures. The principal goal of the course is to provide a reasoned, critical interpretation of shamanism in the context of contemporary debates about its definition and active practice. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 151 or ANTH 160 or ANTH 162 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 360 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 604 The First Americans
This class will review the ongoing scientific debate concerning the routes and chronologies of the earliest human migrations into the Americas. It surveys the history of the dispute over the antiquity of archaeological sites in North and South America, and investigates the paleontological, genetic, geological, and archaeological records for clues to the various peopling models and processes. As a counterpoint to the scientific approach, it also explores public arguments over the issue, to assess the socio-cultural and political repercussions of archaeological discoveries. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 605 Mortuary Practices in the Archaeological Record
Students study theories and methods of burial practices in the archaeological record. They learn about past communities; attitudes toward death and burial and how social organization, complexity, ideology, power, gender and age roles contribute to mortuary practices. The course examines a variety of Old and New World examples from different chronological periods through class presentations, debates and written assignments. The course focuses on comparisons and evaluation of traditional and current methods and approaches. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 151 or ANTH 310 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 619 Field Concepts and Methods in Geoarchaelogy
A field course taught during the three week summer session. Involves all-day excursions to different regions in order to introduce students to a variety of archaeological landscapes and environments. Focuses on the application of geoscientific concepts and methods in archaeological field investigations, emphasizing natural processes such as erosion, deposition, weathering, and biological and human activity that create and modify the archaeological record, and on soil-stratigraphic and geophysical approaches to landscape and site investigations. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 648 Human Osteology
Techniques in bone identification, sex, race, age determination, stature reconstruction, paleopathology, and bone biology are reviewed. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LAB.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 650 Human Reproduction: Biology and Behavior
This is a comprehensive course in the biology of human reproduction (anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology). The implications of human reproductive biology for the evolution of human behavior are considered as well. Students also examine in detail the methods and theories underlying two interconnected approaches utilized by biological anthropologists in the study of human reproduction: human reproductive ecology, which focuses on the biological determinants of human reproductive function and reproductive success, and human behavioral ecology, which focuses on evolutionary relationships between human reproductive strategies and human social behavior. The course is the first part of a two-semester sequence (ANTH 650 and ANTH 660) that examines in detail biological and cultural determinants of human reproductive strategies. Prerequisite: ANTH 304 or ANTH 340 or BIOL 152 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 652 Population Dynamics
Examination of possible interrelationships between the demographic structure of a population and the forces of evolution. Students are exposed to field methods and techniques of population studies. Prerequisite: An introductory course in anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 660 Human Reproduction: Culture, Power, and Politics
This seminar analyzes and critiques the socially constructed nature of reproductive practices and their articulation with relations of power. Topics range from conception to menopause, infertility to population. Cases are drawn from a wide variety of cultural contexts. This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence (beginning with ANTH 650) that examines in detail biological and cultural determinants of human reproduction. (Same as WGSS 660.) Prerequisite: ANTH 650, or 6 hours in women's studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 663 The Anthropology of Islam
This course uses critical readings of major anthropological works on Islam to: 1) analyze various interpretations of "Islamic cultures" through a discussion of regionally-grounded works, and 2) examine how the anthropological study of Islam also is informed by theoretical and philosophical approaches to major anthropological questions, such as religion, myth, kinship, social organization, and power. The course offers both a history of various interpretations of Islam as well as a history of theories of these interpretations. (Same as AAAS 663.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 664 Women, Health, and Healing in Africa
The course explores the values, practices, cultural systems and social-economic conditions that influence the sickness and health of women in Africa. The focus is on theoretical and applied debates and issues including: contraception, infertility, and reproduction; HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections; spiritual suffering and mental illness; trauma and violence; chronic illness, disability, and aging; pharmaceuticals, biotechnologies, and clinical research. (Same as WGSS 664.) Prerequisite: 6 hours of coursework in Anthropology and/or Women's Studies and/or African American Studies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 665 Women, Health, and Healing in Latin America
This seminar uses a life-cycle approach to examine women's health (physical, mental, and spiritual) and their roles as healers. Special consideration is given to the effects of development programs on well-being, access to health care, and changing roles for women as healers. Cases will be drawn from a variety of Latin American contexts. (Same as WGSS 665 and LAA 665.) Prerequisite: 6 hours of coursework in anthropology and/or women's studies and/or Latin American studies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 666 Anthropology of Religion
An examination of the various approaches (individual, ritual, and cognitive) anthropologists have adopted in the study of religion, with emphasis on millenarian and prophetic movements as examples of radical change. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 671 The Culture of Consumption: (E.G. United States and Japan)
Examines the ideologies of capitalism and consumerism as they influence social institutions and daily life. Topics for consideration grow out of instructors' interests and may include areas such as class, religion, advertising, politics, gender, medicine, environment, childhood, and education. Prerequisite: ANTH 560 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 674 Political Anthropology
Analysis of political systems of tribal societies and of pre-industrial states. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 675 Anthropology of Law
Comparative analysis of the legal and political strategies used to achieve social control in both Western and non-Western cultures. Emphasis on the differential use of customary and legal sanctions, formalized procedures of negotiation or adjudication, and the role of legal specialists in society. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 690 The Social Construction of the Self
A seminar exploring concepts of the self as the product of variable social and cultural conditions. Consideration of dominant anthropological and interdisciplinary theories of the self and how the self is construed in various societies from Asia, the Pacific, and elsewhere. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 696 Language, Culture and Ethnicity in Prehistoric Eastern Europe
The course is for students who wish to understand the prehistory of Eastern Europe with special attention to the Slavs. The interdisciplinary course examines East European prehistory from the perspectives of archaeology and linguistics, considering also how ideologies have influenced the interpretation of results. No language prerequisite. (Same as SLAV 635) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 699 Anthropology in Museums
The course reviews the history of archeological, ethnographic, physical anthropological and other types of collections. It also considers current issues facing anthropologists, such as: contested rights to collections and the stories that accompany them; representation and interpretation of cultures; art and artifact; conceptualization, design and building of exhibitions; and anthropological research and education in the museum. (Same as MUSE 699.) Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or ANTH 108 or consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Olsen, Sandra
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM SP 6A - LAWRENCE
3 28178
ANTH 701 History of Anthropology
Development of the field of anthropology and its relations with intellectual history. Emphasis on method and theory in historical context. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 702 Current Archaeology
An introduction to fundamental theoretical orientations and methodological approaches in world archaeology. Case studies illustrate data acquisition, dating methods, culture history, paleoenvironmental models, and culture processes. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 703 Current Biological Anthropology
The fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary biological anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 704 Current Cultural Anthropology
The fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary cultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hannoum, Majid
Tu 02:30-05:00 PM FR 633 - LAWRENCE
3 28167
ANTH 705 Technological Change: _____
Studies in technological change through invention, evolution, and diffusion. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 706 Current Linguistic Anthropology
This course will cover fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary linguistic anthropology. (Same as LING 706.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 707 Responsible Research and Scholarship in Anthropology
This course examines a range of issues critical to responsible research, scholarship, and practice in anthropology. Required for all doctoral students in Anthropology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in anthropology or consent of instructor. SEM.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 710 History of American Archaeology
A survey of the development of method and theory in American archaeology, with emphasis on North America. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 715 Seminar in North American Archaeology
In-depth examination of specific problems and issues in the study of archaeology in North America including the Arctic. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Archaeology or instructor's consent. SEM.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 718 Seminar in Latin American Archaeology:_____
In-depth examination of specific problems and issues in the study of Precolombian societies of Mesoamerica, Central America, and South America. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: ANTH 506, ANTH 508, and/or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 720 Seminar in Old World Prehistory: _____
Studies of prehistoric cultures and their natural environments. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in anthropology or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 725 Introduction to Linguistic Science
An introduction to the theory and techniques of linguistic science for majors and others intending to do advanced work in linguistics and linguistic anthropology. Emphasis on the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. Lectures and laboratory sessions. (Same as LING 700.) Not open to students who have taken ANTH/LING 106 or ANTH/LING 107. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 730 Linguistics in Anthropology
The study of language as it concerns anthropology. Language systems in relation to culture, language taxonomy, semantics, and linguistic analysis as an ethnographic tool. (Same as LING 730.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 732 Discourse Analysis
This course focuses on linguistic frameworks for the analysis of discourse. Discourse is a linguistic system larger than the sentence (utterance), which connects and contextualizes speech and written text. This course focuses on current issues and theoretical frameworks in the analysis of discourse. Using oral and written data, students will examine how contexts influence and shape linguistic form. Topics covered include transcription systems, the structure and organization of different genres of language, and the performance of social actions, including stance-taking, framing, and the construction of identity. Students will also have an opportunity to perform discourse analytic research on the data of their choice. (Same as LING 732.) Prerequisite: ANTH 706 or permission of the instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Dwyer, Arienne
TuTh 02:30-05:00 PM FR 221 - LAWRENCE
3 28168
ANTH 736 Linguistic Analysis
Practice in applying the techniques of phonological, grammatical, and syntactic analysis learned in introductory linguistics to data taken from a variety of languages of different structural types. (Same as LING 708.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. Not open to students who have taken LING 308. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Pye, Clifton
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM BL 108 - LAWRENCE
3 22989
ANTH 740 Linguistic Data Processing
The tools and techniques necessary to analyze linguistic fieldwork data, including research design, recording and elicitation techniques, computational data processing and analysis, and field ethics. Techniques of research, field recording, and data analysis technology. Methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. Practice of techniques via short studies of at least one language. (Same as LING 740.) Prerequisite: LING 700 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 741 Field Methods in Linguistic Description
The elicitation and analysis of phonological, grammatical, and discourse data from a language consultant. In-depth research on one language. Techniques of research design, methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. (Same as LING 741.) Prerequisite: LING 705 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 743 Nutritional Anthropology: Methods and Theory
This is an intensive course aimed explicitly at graduate students whose research involves some aspect of human dietary behavior (foodways) and human nutrition. It examines the application of both biological and cultural theory to the study of human nutrition and cross-population variation in nutritional strategies and dietary practices. Topics include, among others, the evolution of human nutrition, environment and nutrition, nutritional epigenetics, effects of food scarcity, the cultural meanings of food, food as metaphor, and food and language. A second emphasis of the course is on field methods in nutritional anthropology, including dietary interviews, observation of dietary behaviors, nutritional and anthropometric assessment, nutrient analysis and ever-expanding field methods in nutritional ecology (nutritional endocrinology, physiology and genetics). Ethical issues in nutritional anthropology also are considered. Prerequisite: Graduate student status or permission from instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 748 Language Contact
Theories and case studies of languages in contact. Areal and genetic linguistics, genesis of pidgins and creoles, multilingualism. Social, political, economic, and geographic factors in language change. (Same as LING 748.) Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 749 Linguistics and Ethnolinguistics of China and Central Asia: _____
Selected topics in linguistics and linguistic anthropology, focusing on dominant and/or minority languages of China, Central Asia, or a particular region of Central and Eastern Eurasia. Topics may include any subfield of linguistics, including language contact, typology, dialectology, and sociolinguistics. Topic for semester to be announced. (Same as LING 749.) Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 761 Introduction to Medical Anthropology
An introduction to the social and cultural practices that contribute to health and disease, including a survey of therapy systems in both Western and non-Western societies (e.g., Native American, African, Western allopathic medicine, etc.). This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. Graduate version of ANTH 461 with more advanced requirements. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 762 Human Growth and Development
Consideration of comparative physical growth patterns throughout the human life cycle. Sex and population differences in skeletal, dental, and sexual maturation. Effect of genetic and environmental factors upon growth and maturation. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biological anthropology or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 766 Topics in Biological Anthropology: _____
Topic for semester to be announced. Students may repeat the course for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 770 Research Methods in Physical Anthropology
A practical course in the use of special laboratory techniques of biological anthropological research and methods of data presentation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 775 Seminar in Cultural Anthropology: _____
Intensive consideration of special problems in cultural anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 778 Seminar in Applied Cultural Anthropology
Selected problems in applying anthropological theory, methods, and findings in programs of directed change. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 780 Social Organization
Comparative analysis of the structure, development, and function of human social groups. Emphasis on kinship, legal, economic, and political institutions. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 783 Doing Ethnography
Ethnography is both process and product. The product, a representation of a culture (or selected aspects of a culture), is based on fieldwork, the common term for the ethnographic process. This course explores how ethnographers prepare for the field, do their fieldwork, then report it. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 785 Topics in Ethnology: _____
Topic for semester to be announced. Usually the course will focus on selected problems in the social and cultural life of a people in a particular geographic region of the world. Coverage will include both the classical ethnological literature as well as special issues of current concern. Students may repeat the course for different topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 794 Material Culture
The historical and cross-cultural study of artifacts as embodiments of technological, social, organizational, and ideological aspects of culture. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 798 Introduction to Collections Management and Utilization
This course examines the roles collections play in fulfilling a museum's mission; the obligations ownership/preservation of collections materials create for a museum; and the policies, practices, and professional standards that museums are required to put in place. The course will cover utilization of collections for research, education, and public engagement; address how that utilization informs the need for and structure of collections policies, and introduce the basic practices of professional collections management. (Same as AMS 730, BIOL 798, GEOL 785, HIST 725, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 799 Museum Internship
Provides directed, practical experience in research, collection, care, and management, public education, and exhibits with emphasis to suit the particular requirements of each student. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as AMS 799, GEOL 723, and MUSE 799.) INT.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 801 Proseminar in Anthropology
This course is an introduction to graduate study in Anthropology at the University of Kansas. Students will be introduced to the research interests of KU Anthropology faculty and how their work fits into the history and contemporary landscapes of their fields. This course will provide students with an overview of the resources available at KU to support their graduate studies, internal and external funding sources, information about the design, ethics, and approval procedures for future research, peer review and advisor feedback on research proposals, integration into mentoring networks, and other activities focused on career and professional development. The graded work in the course includes presentation and discussion of faculty research papers, writing a proposal for external funding, and presentation and critique of student proposals. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Sellet, Frederic
Th 03:00-05:30 PM FR 633 - LAWRENCE
3 29277
ANTH 810 Seminar in Ethnolinguistics: _____
An advanced study of the relations between language and culture. Subject will vary each semester; students may repeat the course more than once. (Same as LING 810.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 849 Seminar in Archaeology: _____
Subject matter of seminar to be announced for semester. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 851 Data Analysis in Archaeology: _____
A two-semester course designed to provide graduate students with basic principles in the analysis of archaeological data. Course content will include an introduction to archaeological systematics, analytical procedures, application of multivariate statistics, and computer applications. Topic for semester to be announced. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 853 Theory and Current Problems in Archaeology
Consideration of scientific methodology, basic assumptions of anthropological archaeology, relationship of archaeology and anthropology, and current theoretical and methodological trends in archaeology. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 876 Advanced Medical Anthropology: _____
This course provides advanced training in selected aspects of medical anthropology; the topic for a particular semester will reflect the current interests of the instructor. It is expected that the course content will alternate between theoretical and applied emphases. May be repeated for a total of six hours credit. Prerequisite: ANTH 461 or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 889 Summer Archaeological Field Work
Under the direction of a professional archaeologist, undergraduate and graduate students are taught proper procedures for the excavation and laboratory analysis of data from a prehistoric or historic archaeological site. Data gathered may be used for additional graduate research. Enrollment by application; limited to twenty students. A fee for subsistence costs will be charged. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 890 Training in Archaeological Field Work
Graduate students are taught techniques of archaeological field work, including survey and excavation, as well as laboratory procedures, including artifact classification and curation. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ANTH 896 Graduate Research
Individual investigation of special problems in anthropology. Limit of six hours credit for the M.A. degree. RSH.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
RSH Norman, Lauren
W 12:30-02:00 PM FR 633 - LAWRENCE
1 29654
RSH Adair, Mary
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 24030
RSH Dean, Bartholomew
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 20831
RSH Dwyer, Arienne
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 10158
RSH Gibson, Jane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 10159
RSH Hannoum, Majid
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 15057
RSH Hoopes, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 10162
RSH Orourke, Dennis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 21688
RSH Mandel, Rolfe
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 13743
RSH Metz, Brent
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 14214
RSH Radovanovic, Ivana
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 10164
RSH Raff, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 21813
RSH Sellet, Frederic
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-9 17261
ANTH 897 Internship Research
Experiential learning in the application of anthropology through placement in business, government, community, research, or social service organization or agency. Students design and implement an anthropological project under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology. RSH.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
RSH Adair, Mary
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17711
RSH Dean, Bartholomew
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17712
RSH Dwyer, Arienne
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17713
RSH Gibson, Jane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17714
RSH Hannoum, Majid
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17716
RSH Hoopes, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17718
RSH Mandel, Rolfe
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17719
RSH Metz, Brent
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17720
RSH Orourke, Dennis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17721
RSH Radovanovic, Ivana
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 21814
RSH Raff, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17722
RSH Sellet, Frederic
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
4-6 17724
ANTH 898 Internship Analysis
Experiential learning in the application of anthropology through placement in business, government, community, research, or social service organization or agency. This course is a sequel to ANTH 897. Students finish up any remaining research and deliver their findings to the client. They also prepare a written report and a verbal presentation for the Department of Anthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 897 and Graduate standing in Anthropology. RSH.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
RSH Dean, Bartholomew
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 21975
RSH Dwyer, Arienne
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 17726
RSH Gibson, Jane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 17727
RSH Hannoum, Majid
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 17729
RSH Hoopes, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 17731
RSH Mandel, Rolfe
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 17732
RSH Metz, Brent
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 17733
RSH Radovanovic, Ivana
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 17735
RSH Raff, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 21815
RSH Sellet, Frederic
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 17737
RSH Orourke, Dennis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 21690
ANTH 899 Master's Thesis
Limit of six hours credit for the M.A. degree. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
THE Adair, Mary
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 10166
THE Dean, Bartholomew
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 10167
THE Dwyer, Arienne
12:00-12:00 PM KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 24241
THE Gibson, Jane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 10168
THE Hannoum, Majid
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 15058
THE Hoopes, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 10171
THE Mandel, Rolfe
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 13744
THE Metz, Brent
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 14215
THE Orourke, Dennis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 10165
THE Radovanovic, Ivana
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 21816
THE Raff, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 16657
THE Sellet, Frederic
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 15714

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